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Investing in Women


Written by Plant With Purpose on March 7, 2013 in General

In rural Tanzanian communities, women work long hours taking care of children and household needs, including growing the food their families eat. 

Of the rural women who are economically active in Tanzania, 98 percent of them depend on agriculture for survival. Only five percent of women farmers benefit from agricultural extension services in the form of training, assistance, tools, and seeds. If these women had the same access to resources as men, it is estimated that 100-150 million under-nourished people throughout the world would have enough to eat!  

It is because of statistics like these that we are excited to share that 74 percent of the farmers that Plant With Purpose partners with in Tanzania are women. Women like Hellen, who is a widow and mother of three. 

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Hellen farms a tiny plot that measures about half an acre. She has learned to maximize what little land she has and is now producing three times what she used to grow. Through her Village Savings and Loan Associations (VSLA) group, Hellen has received small loans that allowed her to accumulate one dairy cow, four goats, and 26 chickens. Today, Hellen feeds her children nutritious meals and earns income by selling eggs, animals, maize, and surplus vegetables.

For Hellen, what’s most important is sending her children to school. That’s because education is the surest first step on a path out of poverty. This single mom works hard to pay for her children’s school fees, uniforms, and supplies, as well as providing nutritious meals and other basic necessities. 

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Friday, March 8 is International Women’s Day. Would you consider partnering with mothers in Tanzania by giving toward our Family Gardens project on Pure Charity? Give to honor the women around the world who are taking steps to secure a better future for their families. Give to honor a woman who has blessed your life. 

Together we can help women farmers in Tanzania change the future for themselves and their children. 

Adapted from the spring edition of The Sower, which will be hitting mailboxes next week.
Numbers taken from USAID, Farming First/FAO, and Plant With Purpose.


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